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I was lucky to find out about and have the time to attend the Domain of One’s Own Meetup (September 2020) meeting that was organized by Chris Aldrich. The two meetings I have attended so far have put me in touch with a very friendly group of folks who are deeply knowledgable about the technologies used to support domain of one’s own (DoOO) projects.

I, on the other hand, am not deeply knowledgable about the technologies that support DoOO projects that are scaled for an entire campus. My interest in DoOO projects stems from my work as an adjunct instructor in undergraduate/graduate educational technology courses at my university. And my experience has mostly been using Google Sites to support undergraduate students who are pre-service teachers as they develop their first “professional” website. It has been a fun class to share with students over the last few years. But I’d like to take a step forward. My undergraduate students are all arriving to my class with much stronger expectations that an online presence will be crucial for their interactions with their future students’ parents and their own colleagues. Their impressions of pandemic-era remote teaching and learning also seem to inform their views.

When I have considered DoOO and its relevance to our course, I have been preoccupied with the technologies. Most often, I have started by considering how we could use WordPress instead of Google Sites and then stopped when I realized that the learning curve might be a bit steep. However, perhaps it makes more sense to focus on encouraging students to “own” their own domain first. Indieweb.org has a helpful list of domain name registrars including Hover and Google Domains. I have used Hover been very happy with their service even though I use Reclaim Hosting’s shared hosting with domain registration now.

But the DoOO Meetup was worthwhile and I look forward to attending again as I am able.

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  • Reverend

    This past Tuesday I attended the second Indie WebCamp generously hosted by Chris Aldrich focused on Domain of One’s Own. The format is a more focused 10-15 minute talk around a specific technology, in this meeting Tim gave folks a walk-though of Reclaim Cloud, and then opens up to the 21 attendees for anyone to share something they are working on. Tim shared the Cloud, and not only was I thrilled to see Jon Udell in attendance, but it’s always nice when one of your tech heroes tweets some love for your new project. Even better when you know they’re not one to offer empty interest and/or praise. Thanks Jon!

    https://t.co/6ueOmfk2Li is a huge leap forward. I only just heard of https://t.co/jrJR964WZl today, @timmmmyboy is making excellent use of it to make advanced containerization accessible to edtech. https://t.co/omnjAgIbuR
    — Jon Udell (@judell) September 22, 2020

    It was also very cool to read Will Monroe write-up of the session, and like him I found it a “very friendly group” and I realized while attending that this kind of low-key chatting and sharing is one of the things I have missed these days. Folks like Will who want to explore what’s possible in their classroom with Domains and beyond is a big part of what I miss about the day-to-day work of an edtech in an institution. And while I’m not necessarily chomping at the bit jump back into that game given the current circumstances, the ability to share and chat with folks who are interested in Domains is always a welcome opportunity.

    During the sharing portion of the meetup Jean Macdonald, community manager at mico.blog, turned me on to the Sunlit project while I was bemoaning the dearth of open source alternatives to photo sharing apps like Instagram. Soon after I finally took the leap and signed up for a mico.blog to explore that platform. That platform has been a indieweb cornerstone for many folks I respect like John Johnston, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, and Dan Cohen to name just a few. So I wrote my first post:
    What was even cooler was the fact that while writing this post I logged back into micro.blog and discovered a few folks had welcomed me to the micro.blog community, including Jean Macdonald and Dan Cohen—that makes all the difference.

    I’m sold, so the IndieWeb meetup was a total win for me, and I look forward to the one next month. I am going to start getting serious about headless WordPress development for my new website at jimgroom.net, inspired by Tom Woodward’s talk for #HeyPresstoConf20

    Inspiring, for my new version of https://t.co/bKJeTUAEm3 I am going to try and create something WP headless and play with the wealth of amazing possibilities @twoodwar just casually refers to in his brilliant #HeyPresstoConf20 “talk.” Tom has never stopped living the WP dream https://t.co/fNDYzsM6W5
    — Jim Groom (@jimgroom) September 25, 2020

    So, I’ll have something to share in my journey to learn WordPress headless, which will mean learning javascript, CSS, and some other insanity I am not entirely ready for. I have to give a special thanks to Chris Aldrich for putting this together and working to create a space to talk Domain of One’s Own within the IndieWeb community, and I know Greg McVerry has been pushing hard on this for a while now as well, so it is very much appreciated!