While reading Ian O’Byrne’s Digitally Literate Newsletter, I learned about a blogging challenge called #100DaysToOffload by Kev Quirk – Blog. The challenge is to try to publish 100 posts to your blog within one year’s time (about one post every 3.5 days). The blog posts don’t need to be long-form, deeply meaningful, or even that well written. The important thing is to be writing about topics of interest. Posts can be tutorials or even links to other posts you find interesting.

Right now, I am trying to get in the habit of writing regularly. I want to get comfortable with the idea of working through professional and other creative challenges on my blog. My work as an educational technology administrator and as a teacher presents me with an array of interesting topics that I do not feel I have the time to reflect on as much as I would like. And the circumstances of the pandemic have enforced a professional and personal isolation that I would like to work through. This seems like an excellent opportunity to try work past those challenges and to have something to show for it on my blog. By October 4th, 2021, I hope to have one hundred more posts added to my blog.

At the end of each post, I plan to add the hashtag #100DaysToOffload as well as a sentence indicating how a reader might join the same challenge that I have accepted.

I’m publishing this as part of 100 Days To Offload. You can join in yourself by visiting https://100daystooffload.com.

Domain of One's Own Meetup (September 2020) (events.indieweb.org)
Everyone who is interested in the topic is welcome to attend. We expect there will be students, teachers, designers, web developers, technologists, and people of all ages and ranges of ability from those just starting out with a domain to those running DoOO programs at colleges or even people runnin...

I was lucky to find out about and have the time to attend the Domain of One’s Own Meetup (September 2020) meeting that was organized by Chris Aldrich. The two meetings I have attended so far have put me in touch with a very friendly group of folks who are deeply knowledgable about the technologies used to support domain of one’s own (DoOO) projects.

I, on the other hand, am not deeply knowledgable about the technologies that support DoOO projects that are scaled for an entire campus. My interest in DoOO projects stems from my work as an adjunct instructor in undergraduate/graduate educational technology courses at my university. And my experience has mostly been using Google Sites to support undergraduate students who are pre-service teachers as they develop their first “professional” website. It has been a fun class to share with students over the last few years. But I’d like to take a step forward. My undergraduate students are all arriving to my class with much stronger expectations that an online presence will be crucial for their interactions with their future students’ parents and their own colleagues. Their impressions of pandemic-era remote teaching and learning also seem to inform their views.

When I have considered DoOO and its relevance to our course, I have been preoccupied with the technologies. Most often, I have started by considering how we could use WordPress instead of Google Sites and then stopped when I realized that the learning curve might be a bit steep. However, perhaps it makes more sense to focus on encouraging students to “own” their own domain first. Indieweb.org has a helpful list of domain name registrars including Hover and Google Domains. I have used Hover been very happy with their service even though I use Reclaim Hosting’s shared hosting with domain registration now.

But the DoOO Meetup was worthwhile and I look forward to attending again as I am able.

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